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Can Home Inspectors be Licensed in More Than One State?

By Published On: December 5th, 2022Categories: Home Inspection Career Guide, Home Inspection Tips0 Comments

Can Home Inspectors Be Licensed in More Than One State?

Summary

Home inspectors can be licensed to perform home inspections in more than one state. But if you plan to offer services in another state, you should check the new state’s license requirements—and ensure you meet them—before opening for business.  

Read on to learn why some home inspectors offer services in multiple states, how to find each state’s license requirements, and which states have reciprocity for home inspectors. 

Table of Contents

Why Hold More Than One State-Issued Home Inspection License?

There are a few reasons why you might choose to be licensed to perform home inspections in multiple states. Here are the most common ones. 

You Live Close to a State Border 

If you live close to a state border, getting licensed to perform home inspections in your neighboring state opens a new market for your business. You can add new clients, expand your referral network, and generate more revenue. 

You’ve Established Residency in Two (or More) States 

You may have established residency in more than one state (for example, you may have a second home or a vacation home in another state). If this is the case, becoming a licensed home inspector in the states where you have residency means you can run your business seamlessly (and legally) across state lines. This could also create opportunities to establish additional offices in other states and hire employees to help expand your business and profit. 

You’re Relocating Now or in the Future 

If you’re relocating now or planning to in the future, it’s a good idea to get licensed in your new state (if licensing is required in the new state) ahead of your move. This will make for a smoother transition of your business state to state. 

Check Home Inspector License Requirements Before Inspecting in Another State

Before you offer your services to a client in another state, you should check the home inspection license requirements for that state.  

Some states require home inspectors to be licensed prior to offering home inspection services. Others may not require a license but do require training. And still, other states don’t have any licensing or education requirements.  

It can be confusing. That’s why your first step before inspecting a home in a new state is to make sure you meet the legal requirements to be a home inspector in that state. 

Quickly find out all state license requirements for home inspectors. 

If the New State Requires Licenses for Home Inspectors 

If you find that a new state requires you to have a license to inspect homes, you should first check if the state has reciprocity for home inspectors.  

Reciprocity just means that a licensed home inspector in one state can apply for an equivalent home inspector license in another state. The process typically involves completing an application for a license in the new state; paying an application fee; submitting to a background check; and providing proof of home inspector training, passing exam scores, and experience hours. Some states may also require you to take and pass the National Home Inspector Exam.  

It all depends on the reciprocity agreement for each state. 

If the New State Doesn’t Require Licenses for Home Inspectors 

If the new state doesn’t require you to have a license to perform home inspections, you should still check for any local regulations you may need to meet before offering your services. 

In licensed and non-licensed states, you’ll still need to register your business with the Secretary of State for tax purposes and secure a business license to legally provide your services. 

Don’t Inspect Homes Without Knowing the License Requirements 

It may go without saying, but you shouldn’t inspect a home in another state—or even in your current state—without first understanding and meeting the license and/or education requirements.  

If you provide home inspection services without a required license, without understanding the state’s Standards of Practice, or without meeting other regulations, you could incur legal and financial penalties. This is simple to avoid. Double-check the home inspection license and training requirements with each state’s regulatory board and ensure you meet them for any state you plan to work in. 

States That Require Home Inspectors to Be Licensed

The below states require home inspectors to complete home inspector training and earn a state-issued license before performing home inspections. 

States Where Licenses are Required for Home Inspectors
Alabama
Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
Connecticut
Delaware
Florida
Illinois
Indiana
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maryland
Massachusetts
Mississippi
Montana
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin

States That Don’t Require Home Inspectors to Be Licensed

The below states don’t require home inspectors to complete home inspector training and earn a state-issued license before performing home inspections.

States Where Licenses are Not Required for Home Inspectors
California
Colorado
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Iowa
Kansas
Maine
Michigan
Minnesota
Missouri
Nebraska
Pennsylvania
Utah
Washington, D.C.
Wyoming

 

Some of these states—including California, Georgia, and Pennsylvania—have other regulations you must meet before providing inspections. Some regulations may be city- or county-created statutes. Others might enforce a requirement to join a home inspection association, such as the American Society of Home Inspectors (ASHI) or the International Association of Certified Home Inspectors (InterNACHI). Always check the requirements for home inspectors in your locale before opening for business.  

In non-licensed states, it’s also a good idea to complete comprehensive home inspector training even though it’s not required. Professional home inspectors should be qualified to perform home inspections before offering them. 

States with Reciprocity for Home Inspectors

The below states have reciprocity agreements with other states for home inspectors. This information is current as of December 2022. Since state requirements can change, we recommend always checking with a state’s home inspection regulatory board for the most updated reciprocity information. 

State Reciprocity Agreement  State Home Inspection Regulatory Board 
Arizona Home Inspector Reciprocity  Arizona State Board of Technical Registration 
Arkansas Home Inspector Reciprocity  Arkansas Home Inspector Registration Board 
Connecticut Home Inspector Reciprocity  Connecticut Department of Consumer Protection 
Delaware Home Inspector Reciprocity  Delaware Board of Home Inspectors 
Florida Home Inspector Reciprocity  Florida Department of Business & Professional Regulation 
Illinois Home Inspector Reciprocity  Illinois Department of Financial & Professional Regulation 
Indiana Home Inspector Reciprocity  Indiana Professional Licensing Agency 
Kentucky Home Inspector Reciprocity  Kentucky Board of Home Inspectors 
Louisiana Home Inspector Reciprocity  Louisiana State Board of Home Inspectors 
Maryland Home Inspector Reciprocity  Maryland Division of Occupational and Professional Licensing 
Massachusetts Home Inspector Reciprocity  Massachusetts Board of Registration of Home Inspectors 
Mississippi Home Inspector Reciprocity  Mississippi Home Inspector Division 
Montana Home Inspector Reciprocity  Montana Department of Labor and Industry 
New Hampshire Home Inspector Reciprocity  New Hampshire Board of Home Inspectors 
New Jersey Home Inspector Reciprocity  New Jersey Home Inspection Advisory Committee 
New Mexico Home Inspector Reciprocity  New Mexico Home Inspectors Board 
New York Home Inspector Reciprocity  New York Division of Licensing Services 
North Carolina Home Inspector Reciprocity  North Carolina Home Inspector Licensure Board 
Ohio Home Inspector Reciprocity  Ohio Division of Real Estate & Professional Licensing 
Oklahoma Home Inspector Reciprocity  Oklahoma Construction Industries Board 
Oregon Home Inspector Reciprocity  Oregon Construction Contractors Board 
Rhode Island Home Inspector Reciprocity  Rhode Island Contractors’ Registration and Licensing Board 
South Carolina Home Inspector Reciprocity  South Carolina Residential Builders Commission 
South Dakota Home Inspector Reciprocity  South Dakota Real Estate Commission 
Tennessee Home Inspector Reciprocity  Tennessee Department of Commerce & Insurance 
Texas Home Inspector Reciprocity  Texas Real Estate Commission 
Virginia Home Inspector Reciprocity  Virginia Board for Asbestos, Lead, and Home Inspectors 
Washington Home Inspector Reciprocity  Washington State Department of Licensing 

States Without Reciprocity for Home Inspectors

The below states do not have reciprocity agreements with other states for home inspectors. In these states, you’ll need to earn a home inspector license by meeting all of the state’s home inspection training and license requirements (if the state has those requirements).  

States Without Reciprocity for Home Inspectors
Alabama
Alaska
California
Colorado
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Iowa
Kansas
Maine
Michigan
Minnesota
Missouri
Nebraska
Nevada
North Dakota
Pennsylvania
Utah
Vermont
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming

Check Your State Requirements and Get Started With AHIT Training!

AHIT makes it easy to understand your state’s home inspector license requirements—and follow a step-by-step path to licensure and/or qualifying training. Enroll in AHIT home inspection training and start working toward your license in one (or more) states today! Learn more about becoming a home inspector. 

About the Author: Ashley Roe

Ashley Roe is a Content Specialist with AHIT and The CE Shop. She writes regularly about home inspection and appraisal. With a reporter's eye and a passion for learning, Ashley stays current on what's happening within each industry. Her goal is to create engaging, relevant, and useful content that both informs and inspires readers.

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